Brain Tea for Dementia and Memory

In this article we will discuss about brain tea for dementia and memory, the best tea to improve your cognitive function, and look at some recent studies that suggest tea consumption can benefit cognitive health.

Many people today are trying to find ways to enhance their cognitive health.

But with all the supplements, medication, and other items on the market, it can be hard to know what is really right for our needs.

The relationship between tea and dementia is something of interest for many of us who are looking for a natural answer to stay mentally healthy.

Moreover, we will discuss some alternative drinks that may lower your dementia risk.

A drink that reduces your risk of dementia

Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging study examines the connection between habits and cognitive disorders. [1]

There were 957 Chinese over 55 years of age in the study.

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Research has shown that regular tea drinkers had a 50% reduced risk of cognitive decline.

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Additionally, they found that individuals carrying the APOE e4 gene were more inclined to develop Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form of dementia. 

The APOE e4 gene conferred a greater protective effect against cognitive impairment (86%) in participants who consumed daily tea. 

Brain Tea for Dementia and Memory

Globally, over 55 million people suffer from dementia, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). 

Each year, at least ten million more individuals are expected to suffer from dementia. 

There are ways to improve the function of your brain and prevent cognitive decline, even if aging, genetics and chronic diseases such as hypertension are major risk factors.

It has been found that nearly 40% of dementia cases can be prevented or delayed, according to the CDC.

Research has shown that certain drinks, such as tea, may enhance cognitive function.

Here we’ll look at recent studies that relate tea consumption to improved cognitive health and the best teas for improving your cognitive function.

Moreover, we will discuss some alternative drinks that may lower your dementia risk.

Green Tea

green tea brain tea for dementia
green tea brain tea for dementia

Camellia Sinensis leaves are used to produce green tea, known around the world as a healthy beverage. A high content of antioxidants makes it beneficial for promoting health as we age and reducing the risk of chronic illness. 

You can also lose fat and strengthen your immune system by drinking green tea.

Globally, over 55 million people suffer from dementia, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). 

Each year, at least ten million more individuals are expected to suffer from dementia. 

There are ways to improve the function of your brain and prevent cognitive decline, even if aging, genetics and chronic diseases such as hypertension are major risk factors.

CDC data shows that nearly 40% of dementia cases are preventable or delayable.

Research has shown that certain drinks, such as tea, may enhance cognitive function.

The purpose of this article is to explore the positive relationship between tea and dementia, the best teas for improving your cognitive function, and some recent studies that show tea is beneficial to cognition.

Moreover, we will discuss some alternative drinks that may lower your dementia risk.

Black Tea

black tea brain tea for dementia
black tea brain tea for dementia

Black tea comes from the same plant family as green tea and may reduce dementia risk through its compounds. 

Moreover, it contains antioxidants such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and other substances that can fight free radicals thereby protecting against chronic diseases.

The consumption of black tea reduces LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and dementia risk as well.

One study from the University of Newcastle studied both black and green tea consumption and determined that both lowered Alzheimer’s risk. 

Rosemary Tea

rosemary tea brain tea for dementia
rosemary tea brain tea for dementia

While most people think of rosemary as a cooking ingredient, it also tastes excellent in tea. 

There is still a need for more research, but some studies have found associations between rosemary intake (750mg) and enhanced memory speed.

Even though rosemary tea has yet to be studied in-depth, evidence suggests that drinking and inhaling the compounds it contains can help you feel happier and improve your memory. Further, airborne rosemary oil was shown to elevate mood and stimulate brain activity in a study of twenty healthy adults.

Listed below are some other types of tea 

Several popular teas are also thought to enhance long-term memory, above and beyond those mentioned above.

Here are a few other brain teas to consider:

  • White Tea
  • Matcha
  • Ginkgo biloba 
  • Peppermint Tea

Brain Health and Coffee

Scientific studies have shown that coffee boosts cognitive performance, improves clarity, and increases alertness if you aren’t a tea drinker.

Study results suggest brain-boosting beverages aren’t limited to tea. In one study from the Krembil Brain Institute, coffee consumption was linked with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s. 

Multiple coffee beans were tested for their different compositions. 

In Alzheimer’s patients, coffee has been shown to slow cognitive decline by containing antioxidants and compounds that have neuroprotective properties.

A flavonol in coffee called quercetin can inhibit inflammation, as well as lessen oxidative stress.

More specifically, phenylindanes that cause Alzheimer’s were found in the beans. 

In a study, dark roast coffee showed better neuroprotective effects due to its phenylindanes.

The Benefits of Caffeine for the Brain

Caffeine appears to improve cognitive performance in quite a few studies.

An article in the Journal of Nutrition suggested that caffeine in coffee may affect thinking skills over time. 

In this study, alcohol consumption was also associated with improved mental performance. Although recommended intake amounts were not established, long-term memory showed no benefits.

Researchers from the National Institute of Aging analyzed caffeine and alcohol intake in 727 women and men who participated in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. 

As a surprise, the test subjects who did best on the 10 memory tests were the ones who had high scores on the healthy diet and high caffeine scales.

This suggests that a well-balanced diet high in nutrients may be even more beneficial to brain health. 

So, what’s the connection between caffeine consumption and cognition?

We know that it’s a brain stimulant, but it also has the ability to block adenosine receptors to give you an energy rush. 

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This may result in an increase in cognition and reducing the risk of cognitive impairment as we age. It may also result in slight increases in physical activity that keep our brain working.

The research behind caffeine is still a gray area. There hasn’t been a robust amount of evidence at this time to link it with a reduced incidence of dementia.

Negative and Positive side to caffeine

To a certain extent, it might enhance mental performance. A 2012 study showed that caffeine was effective at improving some-but not all-core proofreading tasks, including vigilance, response times, and information processing.

You will not achieve better results if you do this. People who regularly consume a little caffeine (under 100 mg of caffeine a day) benefit from caffeine more than those who regularly consume a lot (over 300 mg caffeine a day) however, the improvements are very small.

The evidence that people who regularly consume a lot of caffeine do perform better with more caffeine suggests that they are simply counteracting the effects of caffeine dependence, so they are achieving roughly the same results they would have without being addicted to caffeine.

However, expectations might also have an impact on reaction times. Several studies have demonstrated that caffeine increases vigilance and reaction times. Another study published in 2009 demonstrated that this might be due to the anticipation effect.

As drugs affect perceptions and behaviors, expectation effects play a significant role. Caffeine users’ expectations of how it will affect their performance, especially if they expect it to impair performance, might influence some of these gains.

People compensate for the negative effects of caffeine if they assume it will hurt their performance.

With appropriate dosages, caffeine has a calming effect on the mood. Norepinephrine, dopamine, and acetylcholine are neurotransmitters that are affected by caffeine. Two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day were associated with a lower risk of suicide according to a study published in 2013.

Conclusion: You should drink these brain tea and cofee to cut your risk of  dementia, however just remember that it is not a panacea for all problems!